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Recently promulgated Part 107 (14 CFR § 107.1 et. seq.) (which you must follow during commercial operation) provides in Section 107.29(b):

(b) No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft system during periods of civil twilight unless the small unmanned aircraft has lighted anti-collision lighting visible for at least 3 statute miles. . . .

Civil twilight (unless you are in Alaska) is 30 minutes before/after sunrise/sunset.

I don't know whether these are visible for 3 miles at twilight, but I got a pair and they look awesome and seem like they will fill the bill (they really are bright). As a further benefit they are visible during daylight and are a real help figuring out which way the Solo is facing. 3DR Solo LED Light Kit

My only complaint so far is that it includes no instructions. It is not immediately obvious how these go on the Solo. I uploaded some pictures that may help. As you see it plugs into the accessory bay with the short wire going to the back. The second picture shows that you have to orient the strip so that the Polar Pro trademark is on top. The strips push onto the legs. I may put some black tape over the second wire to insure that it doesn't tangle the gimbal.

I have a question whether future accessories that need the bay will have an output so the lights can be daisy chained; I suppose it will depend on the current draw of the accessory.

Speaking of current, the lights obviously take some current from the battery to operate but as yet I have no real life use to give a clue how much. These are LED lights, so maybe the draw is low.

IMG_1524.JPG IMG_1525.JPG
 
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Those lights do not fit the bill as anti-collision lights. They're only visible from directly forward or backwards, they're definitely not visible from 3 miles, and they do not flash. A legit ACL system would need 360 degree visibility, which on the solo would require at least two, probably top and bottom or left and right, covering 180 degrees each, flashing at a very high intensity.

This is the brightest one out there that I'm aware of. You would need two. Attaching one on each side, or one on the belly and one on top of the battery. The company specifies that it meets or exceeds the requirements for night flight visibility. A few people that have them report they are indeed ludicrously bright.
DS-30--1 Drone Strobe
 
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Recently promulgated Part 107 (14 CFR § 107.1 et. seq.) (which you must follow during commercial operation) provides in Section 107.29(b):

(b) No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft system during periods of civil twilight unless the small unmanned aircraft has lighted anti-collision lighting visible for at least 3 statute miles. . . .

Civil twilight (unless you are in Alaska) is 30 minutes before/after sunrise/sunset.

I don't know whether these are visible for 3 miles at twilight, but I got a pair and they look awesome and seem like they will fill the bill (they really are bright). As a further benefit they are visible during daylight and are a real help figuring out which way the Solo is facing. 3DR Solo LED Light Kit

My only complaint so far is that it includes no instructions. It is not immediately obvious how these go on the Solo. I uploaded some pictures that may help. As you see it plugs into the accessory bay with the short wire going to the back. The second picture shows that you have to orient the strip so that the Polar Pro trademark is on top. The strips push onto the legs. I may put some black tape over the second wire to insure that it doesn't tangle the gimbal.

I have a question whether future accessories that need the bay will have an output so the lights can be daisy chained; I suppose it will depend on the current draw of the accessory.

Speaking of current, the lights obviously take some current from the battery to operate but as yet I have no real life use to give a clue how much. These are LED lights, so maybe the draw is low.

View attachment 3861 View attachment 3862
Hey Robert, looks good. Here is some additional reading on the lights that may answer some of your questions..
 
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...This is the brightest one out there that I'm aware of. You would need two. Attaching one on each side, or one on the belly and one on top of the battery. The company specifies that it meets or exceeds the requirements for night flight visibility. A few people that have them report they are indeed ludicrously bright.
DS-30--1 Drone Strobe
Even if mounted behind/above/below the lens axis, don't you think the strobing would show up in the video? Reflected strobing off of your subject (ground, trees...) as well.
 
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I have been looking at a DIY searchlight for custom.
was going to use one or two of those 100 watt LED chips
sadly the battery power to drive one of those things is massive
 
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Even if mounted behind/above/below the lens axis, don't you think the strobing would show up in the video? Reflected strobing off of your subject (ground, trees...) as well.
Most likely, yes. Light will probably bounce off the legs and props into the camera.
 
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How about that new 2,000 lumen flood light that Colin mentioned in recent newsletter? I checked price and it was $300+ but looked intense!
 
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Those lights do not fit the bill as anti-collision lights. They're only visible from directly forward or backwards, they're definitely not visible from 3 miles, and they do not flash. A legit ACL system would need 360 degree visibility, which on the solo would require at least two, probably top and bottom or left and right, covering 180 degrees each, flashing at a very high intensity.
DS-30--1 Drone Strobe


Where did you find this information? I have looked at the DOT and FAA anticollision light specifications and they seem to not fit exactly what your quoting. Can you show me a citation for this information, I was just going to follow these guidelines set forth by Title 14 of the CFR's. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-1999-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-1999-title14-vol1-sec23-1401.pdf The intensity of the red flasher being 400 candles at 0-5 degrees is not that bright. it also only shows 75 degrees above and below. The CFR 14 107 and 91 rules seem to mirror each other closely.
 
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What you posted is for a fixed wing aircraft. Rotorcraft is different.

That said, the actual FAR on what is required is probably not as strict as what I posted. What I posted is generally accepted practice that pretty much any modern rotorcraft will have... 360 degree AC lights. It also says something along the lines of illuminating the critical areas. Given our drones can rapidly move in any direction at any time, this ambiguity can easily allow a FSDO inspector to tell you 360 degrees is required.

Technically, The FARs all say AC lights must be red. However, it's widely accepted to have red or white for AC lighting. I'm sure that's in writing somewhere too, I just don't know where. I'm not aware of anyone that makes an LED product like the one I linked above in red, so white is probably it.
 
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What you posted is for a fixed wing aircraft. Rotorcraft is different.

That said, the actual FAR on what is required is probably not as strict as what I posted. What I posted is generally accepted practice that pretty much any modern rotorcraft will have... 360 degree AC lights. It also says something along the lines of illuminating the critical areas. Given our drones can rapidly move in any direction at any time, this ambiguity can easily allow a FSDO inspector to tell you 360 degrees is required.

Technically, The FARs all say AC lights must be red. However, it's widely accepted to have red or white for AC lighting. I'm sure that's in writing somewhere too, I just don't know where. I'm not aware of anyone that makes an LED product like the one I linked above in red, so white is probably it.
Your reply has a lot of conjecture. 1st of all, an FAA inspector has to give you information based on the laws as written. You are in compliance or not. The reason is simple; you wouldn't want one inspector's 'opinion' to differ from another's when you land that same aircraft in a different district and the new inspector have to tell you you are not in compliance.
2nd, the lighting requirement for rotorcraft are the same section as fixed wing as quoted by @Anttler. Also, not sure where this is from "The FARs all say AC lights must be red". As a pilot, I'm glad they are not, it would be impossible to determine an aircraft's orientation and direction of travel when you are sharing airspace with it.
Here is from the FAA Rotorcraft Handbook:
In order to see other aircraft more clearly, regulations require that all aircraft operating during the night hours have special lights and equipment. The requirements for operating at night are found in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 91. In addition to aircraft lighting, the regulations also provide a definition of night flight in accordance with 14 CFR part 91, currency requirements, fuel reserves, and necessary electrical systems. Position lights enable a pilot to locate another aircraft, as well as help determine its direction of flight. The approved aircraft lights for night operations are a green light on the right cabin side or wingtip, a red light on the left cabin side or wingtip, and a white position light on the tail. In addition, flashing aviation red or white anticollision lights are required for night flights. These flashing lights can be in a number of locations, but are most commonly found on the top and bottom of the cabin.

Also, I could not find where lighting requirements vary by maneuverability of the aircraft. Perhaps I missed it?
 
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What you posted is for a fixed wing aircraft. Rotorcraft is different.
I'm sorry you are mistaken. At least that is what Legal Information Institute from the Cornell University Law School believes. I suppose you may know something more about the federal code of regulation then they do. 14 CFR 27.1401 - Anticollision light system. That is the definition of an anti-collision light according to the FAA no matter what Category, class, or type of aircraft it's on.
 
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I think you fellows are getting ahead of yourselves. New Part 107 does not allow night flights; only twilight flights with anti-collision lights. To do night flying you will need a Section 333 exemption. I suspect (not in stone because this is all new) that in order to get the exemption you will need to specify what lights you intend to use, and that will satisfy the FAA, or not.

BTW, the PolarPro lights are being billed as "orientation lights" on the new Made for Solo Page Made for Solo | 3DR - Drone & UAV Technology and from my use of them so far that is just what they do. They are not billed as anti-collision lights. My mistake in starting the thread to suggest otherwise.

Final observation: the lights Pedals2Paddles linked to are not that expensive. Why not buy one and post your experience? Looks like you could power it with a 9V battery.
 
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@Jubar, when I said AC lights, AC = Anti Collision, not aircraft. So not saying anything about position lights. I can see that was not a wise abbreviation to use. However, as you can see, it clearly stated aviation red. There's a million aircraft out there with nothing but a white beacon, or split red/white beacons. And they get approved all the time. It must be in writing somewhere that white only anti collision lights are ok, or these aircraft would all be failing. I just don't know where. Or, the inspectors just don't care. Either way is good for the OP I guess.

I still believe there is room for ambiguity based on the "critical surfaces" wording if an inspector wanted to push the issue.

@Anttler, you first posted 23.1401, which very specifically says airplane and has different requirements than what you posted the second time, and what I'm talking about, which is 24.1401 which specifically says rotorcraft.
 
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It must be in writing somewhere that white only anti collision lights are ok, or these aircraft would all be failing. I just don't know where. Or, the inspectors just don't care. Either way is good for the OP I guess.

Thanks for the clarification on the AC statement. You're right, I assumed AirCraft. Regarding the collision light colors; As posted.." In addition, flashing aviation red or white anticollision lights are required for night flights. These flashing lights can be in a number of locations, but are most commonly found on the top and bottom of the cabin."
 
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I am utterly shocked various laws and regulations contradict one another... But your post led me to where it's in writing you can use red or white. I knew I'd seen it, and I know I looked it up to make sure before I put a red/white beacon on my former old C150 (bless it's little heart) several years. CFR 24.1401 (rotorcraft) and CFR 23.1401 (Airplanes) both clearly state anti collision lights shall be red. FAR 91.205 however states red or white. And it certainly seems the latter is what any A&P IA or FSDO inspector cares about given all the aircraft flying around with only white anti collision lights. Which is good, because I haven't found any other product like that DS-30-1 LED in something other than white.
 
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There are also advisory circulars out with further information on the anti-collision light. You can use while it states: "(d) Color. Each anti-collision light must be either aviation red or aviation white and must meet the applicable requirements of §23.1397." That beacon on the 150 was a combination position/anti-collision light, I had on of those on my 150. The white rear portion acted as a rear position light, the red front was an anti-collision and it flashed at the proper rate for an anti-collision light. 23.1401 is where the FAA defines and anti-collision light, this could change and probably will at some point through an advisory circular for drones. At the moment though this is what you have for guidance. When in doubt just call the FSDO On a good note, for twilight flight the specs for anti-collision lights can easily be met by some amp draw LED's in an array. I know you're trying to help Paddles and your enthusiasm for drones is awesome.
 
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Not a combined postion/ACL. The whole thing was a flashing beacon. We chose to orient it with the red half facing forward and the white half facing backwards. Two reasons. One, the red light blasting in through the windows and reflecting off the wings was less annoying than white. And second, big super bright white flashing light facing backwards makes it stick out more to aircraft behind me... which makes it less likely I'd be run over by a faster aircraft overtaking me... which is pretty much every other aircraft when you're in a C150 :).

The latest and greatest from Whelen Engineering. (90520 Series LED Flashing Beacon - Whelen Engineering Aviation). The thing is absurdly bright. You could pick the plane out of a crowd in the pattern without trying. A friend had on one his arrow too.
90520.jpg
 
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You could indeed probably make your own with some LED strips and a small circuit to flash them appropriately. Total cost, likely less than $50. You would need to do a good job though and make it look somewhat professional. It can't look like some lights hanging by a thread and some tape. Part of inspection is professional workmanship, so an inspector could easily ding you if it's poorly installed or unreliable. But if done right, could be very effective.
 
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Yes, What you show is listed at a 150 beacon, it acts as a position/anti-collision in the rear and an anti-collision light up front. Had you put that red facing the rear you would not have been legal for night flight on that 150. That was the way the 150 covered the necessary lights for night flight, it was a loophole Cessna found because nothing states the white position light needs to be continuous, the 140 and other models use the same. My 172 has an anti-collision all in red and a rear only position light. I guess you were lucky to have placed it that way did as if reversed you would not have been legal for night flight. You can read about the position light in 14 CFR 23.1385, and the using the other anti-collision light information in 14CFR 1401 you can see how it all fits together. eCFR — Code of Federal Regulations
 
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The 150 had wingtip and tail position lights, solid, not flashing. And it had a solid red incandescent beacon on the tail as well. This light is not marketed as just a C150 product, or in any way intended to be a tail position light. I've seen split red/white beacons on many many aircraft, all because the white is brighter but the red half is less obnoxious to the pilot. I've never heard of scenario you describe, and I'm having a hard time buying it. I could be completely wrong. But what I have seen is FSDO inspectors and IAs fail aircraft for having flashing position lights though. If I tried to pass that thing off as a tail position light, it would never fly. Ha ha. Get it. Fly.

It was a great upgrade. We could turn the beacon on with the engine at idle, and the rest of the electronics wouldn't dim! Put LED landing lights in it too. So we didn't need to shed other electrical loads while landing at night!
 
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