how to use exposure value with solo app 2.1

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Trying to see any difference in the video using EV setting from +2.0 to -2.0 they all look the same.
My settings are:

Camera Hero3+ black
Resolution 1080p
Fps : 30
Protune on
FOV: Narrow
White balance: Raw
ISO: 400
Low light: Off
Color: GoPro color
 
Is there setting you see in my list preventing to get those results?

those settings should not affect whether or not your in-flight EV setting is effective. btw. I use almost same setup as you, only difference is FOV medium and resolution 2.7k and I have same camera as you, but in-flight EV changes should work regardless.
 
What is your firmware version?
(Start-Up Screen - The version number will be displayed briefly on the camera's LCD screen upon powering the unit on.)
I'm at the latest version 03.03.00
 
What is your firmware version?
(Start-Up Screen - The version number will be displayed briefly on the camera's LCD screen upon powering the unit on.)
I'm at the latest version 03.03.00

3.03

bellow is an example using different EV settings - from left to right +2, -2, 0Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 23.44.41.jpg
 
I need to re-word the sticky section on EV_Comp. I think it needlessly confuses things the way I wrote it.

Anyway, the difference between EV_Comp and using an ND filter is important to understand.

Choosing an EV_Comp of -2.0 will reduce the "brightness" of your footage by 2 stops. That equates to 4 times less light than normal.

Using an ND4 filter will do the same thing. It will make your footage 2 stops darker, i.e. 4 times less light than normal.

BUT thats where the similarity stops...

An ND filter reduces the amount of light entering the camera. This causes the GoPro to use a slower shutter speed (shutter speed is set automatically and is independent from frame rate*). Slowing down the shutter causes a motion blur effect similar to film cameras. This has the hugely awesome side effect of eliminating jello.

EV_Comp is applied after the shutter speed has been determined by the GoPro. This means it won't help reduce jello at all.

I haven't gotten a chance to test the new EV_Comp settings in the Solo app, but I plan to use it in tandem with a filter. I'll probably fly with an ND4 or 8 most of the time, but if I notice I am still getting blowouts in the whites, I'll be happy to now have the option to tweak EV_Comp down a stop.


* note: While its true that "shutter speed is set automatically", its not entirely true that it is "independent from frame rate" - the shutter obviously can't stay open for longer than 1 frame. So if you are shooting at a high frame rate like 60fps, then depending on the light, you may be forcing a faster shutter speed than is ideal.
 
I dont understand why using ND4 to 8 when it will causes a motion blur effect.
Do I understand correctly that you choose to loose sharpness to hide the jello effect?

individual frames would be less sharp, but this is not photography. in video this is not noticeable and well controlled motion blur is desired effect. if the shutter speed is 1/300 and you are shooting 30fps then 90% of the time you have gap that was not recorded and your video becomes "jumpy" (jitter effect), this is what you are trying to avoid with ND filter. close your eyes and try to slowly turn around while periodically fast blinking your eyes but try to keep the eyes closed for longer period than open, that's the effect.

if your shutter speed is 1/30 and you are shooting at 30fps then that's same as keeping your eyes constantly open, in videography this is not desired either, that would give maybe too much motion blur.

over many years of watching TV our brains have been "wired" to recognize ratio 2:1 as most acceptable/pleasant - shutter speed of 1/60 would be desired for 30fps video (1/50 for 25fps and so on).

you don't notice loss of sharpness because you are not looking at frozen still frames, video is moving all the time and with aerial videography distant and/or still objects are still sharp. the only time you'll complain your video is not sharp enough would be in case of fast moving close object (such as eagle attacking your drone) but then anyway you would need a camera capable of 1/2000 shutter speed capturing at 1000fps.

well anyway, this is my opinion, I'm new to all this stuff, I've only been involved in photography and this is whole new world for me.
 
I dont understand why using ND4 to 8 when it will causes a motion blur effect.
Do I understand correctly that you choose to loose sharpness to hide the jello effect?
It's hard to explain. See @pete 's answer above.

Bottom line is that Motion Blur is not the same as Blur. You only get the blurring effect in areas that are moving. If you've ever been to the movies or watched a movie on TV, you've watched motion blurred content.

In fact, with an ND filter and slower shutter, you'll get more detail and sharpness out of static areas of the image. This is mostly due to finer detail in shadows and lighter areas. It's hard to explain, but with the shutter open longer, the GoPro sensor can absorb more detail in the darks. Meantime, with the ND filter cutting back the areas of blown out white, you get more detail (shades of white) in the light areas (for example clouds and the sky). Overall it just leads to a cleaner image.

I should mention that this approach requires color correction in post. It's more work, but if done right you get a better image.
 
Thank you both to fill some holes in my knowledge swiss cheese :)
My question was not oriented this way but this is great Information. Is there a way to know what nd filter tout use to get to shutter speed to 1/60 when frame rate would be 30 fps? Or would it be better to play with fps to get to the correct ratio?

Ps I'd did not had the time yet to try again the event settings.
 
Thank you both to fill some holes in my knowledge swiss cheese :)
My question was not oriented this way but this is great Information. Is there a way to know what nd filter tout use to get to shutter speed to 1/60 when frame rate would be 30 fps? Or would it be better to play with fps to get to the correct ratio?

Ps I'd did not had the time yet to try again the event settings.

If you use ND8 (3-stop filter) then more likely 90% of the time you'll be just fine. My frame rate is set to 30 fps and it seems GoPro is always trying to take 1/60 exposure, it will automatically adjust the ISO (within your MAX allowance set in Protune) to achieve 1/60 exposure (when my frame rate is 30fps). Further below I'll try to explain why I think this is the case.

I'm in sunny Australia and ND8 occasionally is not enough.
(I'm actually using SRP Blufix air ND4/CP filter but because it's in combination with CP, it is effectively more or less ND8 filter).
If it's overcast or you shoot just before sunrise or just after sunset you may need to use ND4 instead of ND8.

GoPro has a fixed aperture of f/2.8 so it only has the ISO range to auto-adjust itself in order to achieve correct shutter speed (relevant to your fps setting). If you set in Protune your max ISO allowance of 400 then GoPro has a 2-stop range to play with and to match correctly with 1/60 shutter speed. As long as the lighting conditions are such that GoPro can fit within this 2-stop ISO range while keeping the shutter speed constant at 1/60, then you are save.

Because the aperture is fixed at f/2.8, you absolutely have to use ND filter if you want to keep shutter speed down at 1/60, without the ND filter in normal daylight your shutter speed would be say 1/250 or higher.

In normal photography with standard camera you can adjust your aperture to achieve desired shutter speed but with GoPro you cannot do that so instead we have to use ND filters. For example with standard camera when the light conditions require you to shoot at f/8 1/60 ISO100 with no ND filter, in terms of the amount of light hitting the sensor on GoPro this is equivalent to f/2.8 1/60 ISO100 with ND8 filter.

I've been collecting data on this since I got my Solo, but that's only 3 weeks. Before that I had a cheap drone that could not fly higher than 30 feet and had a very bad/cheap built in camera, Solo is my first real drone that allows me to fly with GoPro.
While I have not found any documentation on this, from my tests it appears that GoPro will always try to use shutter speed 1/60 (when shooting at 30fps), now of course I don't know it for certain because we have no EXIF/Metadata data to check when shooting video on GoPro but we can get EXIF data when taking photos - and what I found is that nearly all of my photos (when shooting with ND filter) were taken at constant shutter speed of 1/60, only ISO is not constant, ISO is different for every photo. I believe that somehow GoPro will try to use same shutter speed for photo that is relevant to whatever is my current video fps setting. The only time any of my photos were taken at shutter speed other than 1/60 was when I could even tell the light conditions were such that it fell outside the auto-adjust ISO range (either way too bright or way too dark).

I think it's a good idea to take few photos between your videos, you can then learn a lot from the EXIF data what works best for you in different scenery and different lighting conditions.

Just to give you an example, here are 3 photos (raw, not post-processed), we have no control of shutter speed settings but in each case GoPro took them at 1/60, but ISO was auto-adjusted by GoPro to allow for the constant shutter speed. From left to right, ISO from EXIF shows : 184, 248 and 139. On that last shot it was already near the limit, if the light conditions were only 2/3 of a stop brighter it would've already run out of the 100 limit and then GoPro would've already adjusted the shutter speed to faster than 1/60.
Also interesting to note that the 2nd and 3rd photo are from the same flight, as you can see GoPro is auto-adjusting for different values of ISO in order to keep shutter speed at 1/60 as you are moving around or tilting the camera which then results in different scenes.
I took another photo of the sunset (similar to the 3rd picture) but taken on the previous flight 30 minutes earlier when the sun was higher, hence light conditions shooting directly towards the sun were much brighter and there ND8 filter was not enough, my ISO was already down to 100 and GoPro "decided" to use shutter speed 1/120. In that scenario it would've been better to shoot at 60fps or use a different filter. In fact for such scenario (shooting bright sunset) I have a different filter SRP Blufix air graduated ND8-ND16 filter (top half of the filter is ND16 and bottom half of the filter is ND8).

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 16.35.45.jpg
 
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I gotta say, Hero 4 is really amazing.... the size and weight still good, and 30fps 4k... seriously good bit rates possible in the right settings, all in a nice little package. But that auto ISO thing keeps catching me out where the scene shifts like white balance is on auto, only it's not. And I'm left correcting it variably to get something close to normal... and I always see the flaw. :)Still, nothing like it. With the lens options coming out. wow.
 
I gotta say, Hero 4 is really amazing.... the size and weight still good, and 30fps 4k... seriously good bit rates possible in the right settings, all in a nice little package. But that auto ISO thing keeps catching me out where the scene shifts like white balance is on auto, only it's not. And I'm left correcting it variably to get something close to normal... and I always see the flaw. :)Still, nothing like it. With the lens options coming out. wow.
Just limit ISO to 400 for video. Regardless of lighting conditions. You'll get a lot less noise and you can fix the exposure in post.
 
Just limit ISO to 400 for video. Regardless of lighting conditions. You'll get a lot less noise and you can fix the exposure in post.

Yes, I do limit ISO, but the video still "flushes" as I crest a tree, or a variation of direction that gets me a lensful of light. Using ND seems to help a bit.... But as I'm I'm Australia, perhaps my preference for ND4 and ND8 might need to step up a notch from the other comments. I'm convinced the camera floats ISO and shutter speed a lot even when limited. Generally still impressed though!
 
Yes, I do limit ISO, but the video still "flushes" as I crest a tree, or a variation of direction that gets me a lensful of light. Using ND seems to help a bit.... But as I'm I'm Australia, perhaps my preference for ND4 and ND8 might need to step up a notch from the other comments. I'm convinced the camera floats ISO and shutter speed a lot even when limited. Generally still impressed though!
You don't have the spot meter on do you?
 
Never get that situation on my drone -- spot meter would be a tripod, or at least stationary use case for me (but I'm not a trained shutterbug by any means!)... So no, I avoid spot metering on video almost always! I did have auto white balance on for the first flights, unfortunately I was in a spectacular area I only see about once a year.... I turned it off when I got home and realised I couldn't unravel the white balance AND the shutter / ISO changes, almost per frame it seemed. Even the "auto smart fix" thing in my Premiere Elements, which I understand is meant to do that frame by frame, didn't help, after a fair whack of CPU time to try. If I really go nuts on adjustment to the point I can mostly hide the change, it alters the video too much to use with the other shots.

Are you telling me you can lock it down so a "flat" adjustment will always work for a given single shot? (I read your hints with interest, saw some of the genetics of 3DR and MicBergsma in there, plus your top effort putting it all together -- thanks for that by the way, a fairly action-packed read with heaps of information in a nice tight package!) If you've got a setup that can produce more predictable post processing in variable light I'm very interested. Normally I run raw, nativee, iso 400, low sharpness... no spot. :) Also 2.7k @ 60fps, but at the time of my issues I was still basking in the 4k@30fps glory of the Hero 4. :)

Since then I've limited it but not enough to make it non-distracting... so I just chuck away those sequences and am starting to avoid them. Or I'm focusing on something else and I let it through to the keeper!
 

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