New Canadian Laws

Joined
Apr 15, 2017
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#1
I just saw this on the news tonight, WTF!!!

You now need to register your drone and put the registration sticker on it, AND get a license???

Before you fly
  1. Understand your legal requirements when flying drones
  2. Understand the difference between basic and advanced operations
  3. Get the necessary knowledge requirements
  4. Get a drone pilot certificate
  5. Choose the right drone if you want to perform advanced operations
  6. Register your drone
  7. Follow your drone manufacturer’s instructions
  8. Survey the area where you will fly
    • Take note of any obstacles, such as buildings and power lines
While flying
To keep yourself and others safe, fly your drone:
  • where you can see it at all times
  • below 122 metres (400 feet) in the air
  • away from bystanders, at a minimum distance of 30 metres for basic operations
  • away from emergency operations and advertised events
    • Avoid forest fires, outdoor concerts and parades
  • away from airports and heliports
    • 5.6 kilometres (3 nautical miles) from airports
    • 1.9 kilometres (1 nautical mile) from heliports
  • far away from other aircraft
    • Don’t fly anywhere near airplanes, helicopters and other drones
Always respect the privacy of others while flying.
Penalties
You could face serious penalties, including fines and/or jail time, if you break the rules.
Fines for individuals
  • up to $1,000 for flying without a drone pilot certificate
  • up to $1,000 for flying unregistered or unmarked drones
  • up to $1,000 for flying where you are not allowed
  • up to $3,000 for putting aircraft and people at risk




Flying your drone safely and legally (new rules) - Transport Canada
 
Joined
Jul 12, 2016
Messages
279
Likes
124
Location
Tunkhannock, PA
#2
I just saw this on the news tonight, WTF!!!

You now need to register your drone and put the registration sticker on it, AND get a license???

Before you fly
  1. Understand your legal requirements when flying drones
  2. Understand the difference between basic and advanced operations
  3. Get the necessary knowledge requirements
  4. Get a drone pilot certificate
  5. Choose the right drone if you want to perform advanced operations
  6. Register your drone
  7. Follow your drone manufacturer’s instructions
  8. Survey the area where you will fly
    • Take note of any obstacles, such as buildings and power lines
While flying
To keep yourself and others safe, fly your drone:
  • where you can see it at all times
  • below 122 metres (400 feet) in the air
  • away from bystanders, at a minimum distance of 30 metres for basic operations
  • away from emergency operations and advertised events
    • Avoid forest fires, outdoor concerts and parades
  • away from airports and heliports
    • 5.6 kilometres (3 nautical miles) from airports
    • 1.9 kilometres (1 nautical mile) from heliports
  • far away from other aircraft
    • Don’t fly anywhere near airplanes, helicopters and other drones
Always respect the privacy of others while flying.
Penalties
You could face serious penalties, including fines and/or jail time, if you break the rules.
Fines for individuals
  • up to $1,000 for flying without a drone pilot certificate
  • up to $1,000 for flying unregistered or unmarked drones
  • up to $1,000 for flying where you are not allowed
  • up to $3,000 for putting aircraft and people at risk




Flying your drone safely and legally (new rules) - Transport Canada
Last Fall US Congress returned oversight of Hobby and Recreational UAS to the FAA. I am very confident that they are currently organizing mandatory regulations very similar to rules currently imposed on commercial operations that will soon be imposed here in America as well.
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2018
Messages
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Age
55
#3
This is not in effect yet, (coming June 2019) and not really anything new in Canada other than the certificate which you can get online by passing a simple online test....
Basically in Canada for some time now it's been illegal to fly in any city due to restrictions of distance from buildings, people and airports.

For basic operations, you need to take the online exam.
If you pass the Small Basic Exam, you automatically receive your Pilot Certificate – Basic Operations. You can download and print your certificate through the Drone Management Portal.
 
Joined
Dec 30, 2017
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#4
I noticed that the exam fee is $5 for the Canadian certificate. What is the Part 107 up to, here in the good ole US of A now? Like a buck sixty a pop? Niiice!
This is not in effect yet, (coming June 2019) and not really anything new in Canada other than the certificate which you can get online by passing a simple online test....
Basically in Canada for some time now it's been illegal to fly in any city due to restrictions of distance from buildings, people and airports.

For basic operations, you need to take the online exam.
If you pass the Small Basic Exam, you automatically receive your Pilot Certificate – Basic Operations. You can download and print your certificate through the Drone Management Portal.
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2018
Messages
11
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8
Age
55
#5
I noticed that the exam fee is $5 for the Canadian certificate. What is the Part 107 up to, here in the good ole US of A now? Like a buck sixty a pop? Niiice!
In the US no certificate is required for non-professionals. Part 107 is for professional licences only and allows you to fly for pay. It requires a rather extensive in person test for certification.

In Canada non-professionals will be required to obtain the certificate starting July 2019.
 
Joined
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Location
Tunkhannock, PA
#6
In the US no certificate is required for non-professionals. Part 107 is for professional licences only and allows you to fly for pay. It requires a rather extensive in person test for certification.

In Canada non-professionals will be required to obtain the certificate starting July 2019.
And I mentioned earlier in this thread that will soon change. There will be new restrictions placed on non-commercial UAS opps now that Congress returned FAA control of that sector last Fall as part of the FAA Appropriations bill.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Tunkhannock, PA
#8
Normally I would be in full agreement. Understand that it was Congress that stripped the FAA from direct oversight of the non-commercial sector based wholely on the lobby industry you speak of.

The FAA got it back by scaring the lawmakers with their inability to devise, implement. and enforce countermeasures against errant UAS operations in the NAS. It worked! The vote was almost unanimous in favor to return non-commercial UAS oversight away from CBO guidelines to federal control.
I doubt it, but time will tell. The industry lobby is far more effective in the US.
 
Joined
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Age
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#9
Lawmakers would prefer to take all guns, all private vehicles and all personally owned flying machine because all of those can be used to counter the power of government and also for terrorist activities and such things as assassination. Good luck with that in the US. No one will give up their guns or drones.
The fact is that fixed wing remotely controlled aircraft can be even more dangerous when used by those that intend evil.
Until we find a way to kill those who seek to do evil, it's a problem we just have to live with. Lawmakers don't have to stones to kill evil doers, so they may settle for knocking off a few drone pilots.
of course the US FAA does not have totalitarian authority. The US President appoints the director of the FAA (with US congressional approval). Additionally, here's why industry lobbies in the US are very effective.
US Congressional Committees with FAA oversight
These committees have jurisdiction over proposed legislation related to transportation and the FAA, including FAA Reauthorization:
These committees are responsible for the legislation that allocates federal funds to government agencies:
This committee has jurisdiction over civil aviation research and development (including FAA's research, development, and engineering activities) and outer space (including FAA's commercial space activities):
 

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